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How To Wear “Greenery,” The Color Of The Year, using $1.5-Million In Emerald Jewelry

Emerald and diamond bracelet by Roberto Coin.

A lot of Pantone-posing happens around the time of year when the Pantone Color Institute announces its annual Colors of the Year. Greenery, the top tone of 2017, is showing up in everything from nail polish to sofas and coffee makers, but really, is there any better way to express the natural warmth of green than with emeralds, which after all come from the earth? Especially if they are designed in floral or leaf compositions, like this $1-million suite of jewelry by Roberto Coin or this $500,000 trio of treasures from the Chopard Green Carpet collection.

Emerald earrings from the Chopard Green Carpet collection.

Chopard’s Palm D’Or-inspired jewelry watch, with matching ring and earrings, celebrates Chopard’s 20th anniversary of its sponsorship of the Cannes Film Festival and its top award. The company designed and produces the gold Palm D’Or statue, and repeats the motif in this jewelry collection. Drenched with over 90 carats of emeralds, the jewelry watch is part of the brand’s Green Carpet collection, named for the brand’s commitment to combining sustainable luxury and red-carpet glamour. It is set with 11.7 carats of emeralds sourced from Gemfields’ Kagem mine in Zambia, which adheres to environmentally and socially responsible mining principles.

Emerald ring from the Chopard Green Carpet collection.

The gems are prong-set rather than surrounded by metal in order to let in as much light as possible through the pavilions, which is in turn reflected out through the table. The watch is priced at $297,000. The matching ring is 18k white gold, set with 3.1 carats of marquise-cut emeralds, priced at $51,310. The earrings are set with 11.8 carats of marquise-cut emeralds, priced at $151,890.

Emerald and diamond necklace by Roberto Coin.

The emeralds in Roberto Coin’s dazzling necklace, bracelet and earrings ensemble were also sourced in Zambia. Zambian emeralds are the stars of the gem world right now because of their high clarity and stunning bluish-green color – and their greater affordability compared to Colombian emeralds. The matching necklace, bracelet and earrings are collectively priced at just under $1-million. Together they contain 91.6 carats of emeralds and 68.15 carats of diamonds.

Emerald and diamond necklace by Roberto Coin.

The bib-style necklace contains 63 carats of emeralds cut into oval, emerald, marquise and round shapes, and 48 carats of round and marquise cut diamonds. It is priced at $650,000. The chandelier-style earrings contain 12.50 carats of emeralds and 7.7 carats of diamonds, and is priced at $150,000. The bracelet contains 16.10 carats of emeralds cut in oval, emerald, marquise and round shapes, and 12.45 carats of marquise and round shaped diamonds, priced $159,000.

Emerald and diamond earrings by Roberto Coin.

The power of these emeralds to improve not only your appearance but your mood is best described by Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute: “Greenery bursts forth in 2017 to provide us with the hope we collectively yearn for amid a complex social and political landscape. It satisfies our growing desire to rejuvenate, revitalize and unite.”

Emerald and diamond bracelet by Roberto Coin.

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph For Ladies: Because Women Also Drive

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph for ladies.

There is more to Chopard for women than Happy Diamonds and high jewelry watches. The ladies’ Mille Miglia is a smaller, diamond-set version of this year’ special-edition Mille Miglia for men, a mechanical sports watch with substance. Chopard has been a supporter of the Mille Miglia, a scenic, 1,000-mile race from Brescia to Rome, since 1988, and each year introduces a new special-edition timepiece in commemoration. A couple of years ago, Chopard started producing ladies’ Mille Miglia editions, and this year the men’s and ladies’ are identified as a duo.

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph for ladies.

Essentially they are the same model, but the ladies’ is 39mm compared to the men’s, which is 42mm. The ladies’ model has a mother-of-pearl dial with or without a diamond-set bezel (the two elements that most often distinguish a ladies’ watch from a men’s watch), and the men’s has a black or silver dial. Both contain the same COSC-certified automatic chronograph movement, ETA Caliber 2894-2. The rubber strap is inspired by the tread on 1960s Dunlop racing tires. Hands and indexes are coated with Super-LumiNova. Prices range from $4,800 to $12,140.

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph; men's on the left, ladies' on the right.

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph; men’s on the left, ladies’ on the right.

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph Ladies' without diamonds.

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph Ladies’ without diamonds.

 

Chopard Mille Miglia Classic Chronograph Ladies’

Baselworld 2017: Patek Philippe Haute Joaillerie Ref. 4899-900G with flawless gems and a legendary caliber

Patek Philippe Haute Joaillerie Ref. 4899-900G Calatrava.

Patek Philippe’s best men’s debuts at Baselworld 2017 – including the wonderful Ref. 5320 Perpetual Calendar – had to compete for the spotlight with the sensational Haute Joaillerie Ref. 4899-900G Calatrava. I have seen many gem set watches from Patek with impressive carat content and perfectly executed setting, but never have I seen something this creative. It is spectacular without being over the top, which is pure Patek, and a loupe will tell you that it is set with perfect, perfectly-matched gemstones: 149 flawless diamonds and 182 pink sapphires in several shades, for a total aggregate weight of 4.35 carats. The background on the upper dial is natural pink mother-of-pearl, which is rare. It is also delicate, so it is a testament to the steady hand of the engraver that the mother-of-pearl is carved with feather motifs. Another subtle but exquisite detail is the engraving on the 18k gold hands, also to resemble feathers.

Patek Philippe Haute Joaillerie Ref. 4899-900G Calatrava.

The movement is the ultra-thin automatic Caliber 240 with an integrated micro-rotor, silicon-based components and a 70-hour power reserve. Patek celebrates the 40th anniversary of the 240 this year. Remarkably, the movement was developed at the height of the quartz crisis in 1977, when men’s wristwatches were much smaller than they are today. Any movement developed at that time had to be slim to compete with the much smaller proportions made possible by quartz technology.

Automatic Caliber 240 in the Patek Philippe Haute Joaillerie Ref. 4899-900G Calatrava.

Creating a slim automatic was a particular challenge. The key to keeping it slim was a small off-center rotor, recessed into the plate. The micro-rotor kept the 240 to the proportions of a manual-wound movement (it is 2.53mm thick), and today it is a mainstay of the slim Calatrava collection. It has also served as the base for several high complications, including the Celestial Ref.5102 and the World Time Ref. 5110, as well as several perpetual calendars. The Caliber 240 is used in three variations in new introductions this year from Patek Philippe, including the high jewelry Ref. 4899-900G – for which the 240 is perfect, allowing space for the gemsetter to work his magic.

Even the buckle is set.

Case side of the Patek Philippe Haute Joaillerie Ref. 4899-900G Calatrava. Perfectly integrated strap.

Baselworld 2017: Dior VIII Grand Bal Pièce Unique Galaxie Grus

Dior timepieces are often dismissed as fashion watches because Dior is a fashion maison and the watches often contain quartz movements. However, there is a distinction to be made: Fendi is a fashion brand; Guess is a fashion brand. Dior is haute horology.

Dior VIII Grand Bal Pièce Unique Galaxie Grus.

Dior VIII Grand Bal Pièce Unique Galaxie Grus.

The Grand Bal Pièce Unique Galaxie Grus, for example, is a work of high metiers, set with 420 diamonds totaling 2.42 carats. Some of the diamonds are set into the crystal, a delicate process with a high breakage rate, and the dial is composed of Australian opal and hand-engraved gold. The rotor (the brand uses Zenith movements) appears on the dial side, and is also decorated.

Grand Soir Botanic

DiorGrand Soir Botanic

Another unique Dior piece, the Grand Soir Botanic, is set with 7.24 carats of diamonds, 1.07 carats of yellow, blue and pink sapphires, as well as rubies and emeralds. The mesh-textured strap is made with the same technical fabric used on Dior’s Fusion sneakers. I guess that makes it a “fashion” watch by some definitions, but those sneakers cost $1,100.